Tag: Lee Archinal

Smaug Ransomware Detector (Sysmon Behavior)

Today we would like to draw your attention to a relatively recent threat and content for its detection. Smaug Ransomware-as-a-Service appeared on researchers’ radars at the end of April 2020, attackers look for affiliates exclusively on Russian-language Dark Web forums and offer using their platform for a fairly large initial payment and 20% of further […]

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Immortal Stealer

This week, Lee Archinal, the Threat Bounty Program contributor posted a community Sigma rule for detecting yet another infostealer. The “Immortal Stealer (Sysmon Behavior)” rule is available for download in the Threat Detection Marketplace after registration: https://tdm.socprime.com/tdm/info/V0Q03WX81XBY/dEM_SXQBSh4W_EKGVbX_/?p=1 Immortal Infostealer appeared a little over a year ago on the dark web forums with different build-based subscriptions. […]

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Detection Content: LokiBot Detector

In today’s post, we want to remind our readers about LokiBot infostealer that provides backdoors to the victim Windows OS and enables fraudsters to steal sensitive data and even bring in place different payloads. LokiBot infostealer comes to the victims via malspam campaigns often masquerading as a trusted sender, containing an attached document luring the […]

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Threat Hunting Rules: Ave Maria RAT

Today’s article is somewhat a continuation of Detection Content: Arkei Stealer since the author of the detection rule for Ave Maria RAT is the same, and both malicious tools have recently been actively spread using the Spamhaus Botnet.  Ave Maria is a Remote Access Trojan that is often used by adversaries to take over the […]

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Detection Content: Arkei Stealer

Arkei Stealer is a variant of infostealer malware and its functionality is similar to Azorult malware: it steals sensitive information, credentials, and private keys to cryptocurrency wallets. The malware is sold on underground forums, and anyone can acquire and use both the “legitimate” version and the cracked version of Arkei Stealer, making it difficult to […]

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Threat Hunting Content: Emotet Returns Once Again

For never was a story of more woe than this of once again returning Emotet. This time, there were no full-scale campaigns for about seven months, although isolated cases of infection were recorded and researchers found documents distributing this malware. The attacks resumed last Friday, with the botnet sending about 250,000 emails in a matter […]

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Detection Content: Formbook Dropped Through Fake PDF (Sysmon Behavior)

The Covid19 outbreak has revealed a number of blind sides of cybersecurity. We do our best to keep you in the picture of the latest trends on our Weekly Talks, webinars, relevant content Digests. However, human curiosity in the flood of information may be a weak spot. FormBook, the infostealer known since 2016, has been […]

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Threat Hunting Content: DNS.exe Crashing (Possible CVE-2020-1350 detection)

July turned out to be fruitful for disclosed critical vulnerabilities: CVE-2020-5902 (F5 BIG-IP), CVE-2020-8193 (Citrix ADC / Netscaler), CVE-2020-2034 (Palo Alto PAN-OS), CVE-2020-6287 (SAP Netweaver), CVE-2020-3330 (Cisco VPN / Firewalls), and CVE-2020-1350 (aka SIGRed, the vulnerability in Microsoft Windows DNS Server). Last week, Threat Bounty Program contributors and the SOC Prime team published a series […]

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Rule Digest: RATs, Infostealers, and Emotet Malware

Today is Saturday, which means it’s time for our next Rule Digest, in which we will tell you about interesting content for malware detection released this week. And yes, we again pay particular attention to the rules that participants in the Threat Bounty Program have published. We start with the rule published by Ariel Millahuel, […]

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Detection Content: Finding the Lokibot Trojan

Lokibot is trojan-type malware designed to collect a wide range of sensitive data. It was first noticed in 2015 and remains very popular among cybercriminals as it can be purchased at the underground forum by any attacker. A couple of years ago, “tinkerers” learned how to add C&C infrastructure addresses to the Trojan on their […]

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