Tag: Ariel Millahuel

Detection Content: Ransom X Behavior

Another ransomware family appeared this spring and is actively used in targeted attacks against enterprises and government agencies. In mid-May, cybercriminals attacked the network of the Texas Department of Transportation, but unauthorized access was discovered, and as a result, only part of the systems was encrypted. In this attack was used new ransomware – Ransom […]

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Detection Content: PsiXBot Malware Behavior

As Google and Mozilla bring the widespread use of DNS over HTTPS protocol, more malware authors also adopt this perfect opportunity to hide malicious traffic. The recently discovered versions of PsiXBot abuse Google’s DoH service to retrieve the IPs for the command-and-control infrastructure. The malware appeared in 2017 as a simple infostealer that is capable […]

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Rule Digest: RATs, Infostealers, and Emotet Malware

Today is Saturday, which means it’s time for our next Rule Digest, in which we will tell you about interesting content for malware detection released this week. And yes, we again pay particular attention to the rules that participants in the Threat Bounty Program have published. We start with the rule published by Ariel Millahuel, […]

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Rule Digest: APT Groups, Malware Campaigns and Windows Telemetry

This week our Rule Digest covers more content than usual. It compiles rules for detecting recent attacks of state-sponsored actors, malware campaigns conducted by cybercriminals, and abusing Windows telemetry.   Mustang Panda is the China-based threat group that has demonstrated an ability to rapidly assimilate new tools and tactics into its operations. This APT group […]

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Rule of the Week: Bunitu Trojan

Today in the Rule of the Week section we want to highlight a new threat hunting rule from Ariel Millahuel which helps to detect samples of Bunitu Proxy Trojan: https://tdm.socprime.com/tdm/info/3evdCZVz3mCX/_WrlonIBPeJ4_8xctGPi/?p=1 Bunitu Trojan is used for turning infected systems into a proxy for remote clients. Its malicious actions can slow down the network traffic, and adversaries […]

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Threat Hunting Content: Higaisa APT

Higaisa APT has been known since November 2019, when Tencent researchers first documented its activities. The group was discovered recently, but attackers have been operating for several years and use common tools to complicate the attribution. They mainly use mobile malware and the Gh0st and PlugX trojans. Researchers believe that Higaisa APT is a South […]

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Detection Content: Tycoon Ransomware

Despite the fact that new ransomware families appear quite often, most of them are focused exclusively on Windows systems. Way more interesting is Tycoon, a multi-platform Java ransomware that can encrypt files on both Windows and Linux systems. This family has been observed in-the-wild since at least December 2019. Its authors compiled it into a […]

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Rule Digest: Emotet, Ransomware, and Trojans

Hello everyone, we are back with five fresh rules submitted this week by participants of the Threat Bounty Program. You can check our previous digests here, and if you have any questions, then welcome to the chat. Pykspa worm-like malware can install itself to maintain persistence, listen to incoming port for additional commands, and drop […]

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Detection Content: Scarab Ransomware

Scarab ransomware was spotted for the first time in June 2017 and had been reappearing with new versions since then. This ransomware is one of the many HiddenTear variants, an open source ransomware Trojan released in 2015.  The recently discovered versions of ransomware use an improved RSA encryption method and add various extensions to infected […]

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Threat Hunting Content: PipeMon malware detection

PipeMon is a modular backdoor that is signed with a certificate belonging to a video game company, which was compromised by Winnti group in 2018. Researchers at ESET discovered this backdoor used in attacks on companies in South Korea and Taiwan that develop popular Massively Multiplayer Online games. They named the backdoor PipeMon because the […]

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